Corio Vertue Sailing in Westernport - Victoria, Australia (2009)

 

Yacht Class

 Vertue  (Sail No 99)

Designer

Jack Giles, Laurent Giles and Partners

Builder

Gil Albutt

Queenscliff, Victoria, Australia - 1960

Construction

Traditional carvel plank on frame.

Materials Kauri on blue gum frames at 6" centres, copper nails and roves, S/S keel bolts, iron bark keel, red gum stem and sternposts, plywood deck 1991 (originally teak), teak bulwarks capping and laid in main hatch and lazarette, bridgedeck and cockpit
Dimensions

LOA: 25' 3"
LWL: 21' 6"
Beam: 7' 2"
Draft: 4' 6"

Sail Area: 277 sq ft   Displacement: 4.28 tons Thames: 5.67 Tons

Rig

Masthead sloop. Aluminium mast with single spreaders and steps. Timber boom with slab reefing (originally roller). Roller furler on headsail.

 

Corio Vertue is a 25 foot wooden yacht which I bought in 2003. CV is a large part of my life and if I am not sailing her I am in the process of restoring her interior or undertaking general wooden boat maintenance. The following pages document my involvement with CV, provide some of her history, and give some insight in why the Vertue class yacht is so special.

In 2003 I was looking for a new yacht and my requirements were quite specific

(It's 2012 now and these are my comments now)

  • Capable of sailing across Bass Strait (Melbourne - Tasmania)

I have not taken CV across Bass Strait yet but have been in it sailing between Melbourne and Flinders and she is very capable when the wind and waves pick up. The secret is to reef her down so she is not burying the lee rail and she is quite happy in the conditions,

  • Easily managed single handed.

When the sails are balanced CV will sail quite happily on her own

  • Decent sea berths so I could fully stretch out - I'm 6ft +

 I can stretch out fully on CV's bunks

  • Decent headroom

In the main cabin I do not have to stoop to get around. Different story going forward.

  • Comfortable accommodation.

Only having a 7' 2" beam CV is quite 'cosy' down below and it is comfortable. Have all mod cons - sink, water tanks, flushing toilet and stov

  • Within a budget of AUD$36000.

I stopped counting once I reached my limit - in addition to purchase price this also covered transport by truck from Sydney, new engine, new rigging, new electronics and professional wiring. I have done most of the restoration work on own so from now on it's only my time and labor.

  • Not a 'project' boat (i.e. lengthy restoration and/or re-build).

 I still have not finished all the work on CV but she's a sailing project boat!

March 2015 - nearly completed major works so "project" coming to a close soon.

  • She had to look good.

When powerboat owners comment on CV's good looks I know there is something special about her.


 


After searching for a couple of months in the Victorian market place I was becoming despondent with the offerings available. Right size, and capability but the berths were too short, the accommodation was set up around a 'dinette' arrangement (which I hate), or there no facilities for the 'second' mate.

One night I decided to use the Internet to discover what was available Australia wide, and that is how I came across Corio Vertue advertised for sale by a broker in Sydney. In my wildest dreams I never expected to come across a Vertue for sale in Sydney, Australia, especially within my price range. Most of my formative sailing experience, and sailing history, was gained in the UK before I moved to Australia, and therefore I was well aware of the impressive reputation Vertues have as very capable ocean cruising yachts. There were some warning bells within the boat description so next day I phoned the broker to get a clearer picture regarding the condition of CV. Essentially CV was in a rough condition, but generally sound. The galvanised floors were rusted but could be salvaged, but she was definitely worth a  look.

The following Saturday I flew to Sydney to see CV for myself. I must admit on first seeing CV at her pontoon I fell for her charms, but I was determined to try and get an objective assessment of her condition.

Overall she was sound condition, the paint work was rough, down below was a bit of a mess, and there was not much in the way of equipment. A  surveyor was working on an adjacent boat so I engaged his services, left a deposit with the broker, and flew back to Melbourne.

A week or so later I received the surveyor's report and it looked horrendous. After subsequent discussions with the surveyor it transpired that only 6-8 of the defects had to be rectified prior to any serious voyaging (namely the through hull fittings). Essentially, I could rectify the majority of the defects myself, and in that light CV seemed a viable proposition. Consequently, to cover costs to make good the defects, and as there was not much of an inventory I made a ridiculously low offer to the broker. Much to my amazement, within the hour the owner had accepted my offer, and I became the proud owner of Corio Vertue! Only Corio Vertue's good looks could have attracted the lusty lady which adorned her transport to Melbourne.

Corio Vertue Arriving in Melbourne